Collaborators

One of the great things about being a biologist is having the opportunity to work in amazing places with cool people. I’ve been very fortunate to work on some great projects - and make many trips to the pub - with the following folks:


Juvenile European sea bass.

Juvenile European sea bass.

Stefano Marras and Paolo Domenici (Institute for the Coastal Marine Environment, National Research Council, Italy), David McKenzie (Université Montpellier 2, France), Guy Claireaux (Université de Bretagne Occidentale, France), and John Steffensen (Marine Biological Laboratory, University of Copenhagen, Denmark).

Projects: A range of studies examining the significance of individual variation in physiological and behavioural traits for environmental tolerances and predator-prey interactions. Much of this work has focussed on Mediterranean fish species such as the European sea bass or golden grey mullet. 


Two male guppies pursue a female. Photo courtesy of Darren Croft and Safi Darden. 

Two male guppies pursue a female. Photo courtesy of Darren Croft and Safi Darden. 

Darren Croft and Safi Darden (University of Exeter, UK)

Project: The role of physiological traits in animal social interactions and networks.


Juvenile Ambon damselfish with individual coloured tags for identification.

Juvenile Ambon damselfish with individual coloured tags for identification.

Mark McCormick, Lauren Nadler, James White, Maria Palacios (James Cook University, Australia)

 

Project: Relationships between physiological traits and behaviour in juvenile coral reef fishes, including the physiology of fish schooling behaviour. This work is done at the Lizard Island Research Station, on the Great Barrier Reef in Australia.


Capturing fish from a stream outside of Chongqing, China.

Capturing fish from a stream outside of Chongqing, China.

Shi-Jian Fu (Chongqing Normal University, China) and Yu-Xiang Wang (Queen's University, Canada)

Project: Individual variation in hypoxia tolerance and risky behaviours in chinese carp species.


Common minnows swimming in front of a simulated trawl net within a swimming flume.

Common minnows swimming in front of a simulated trawl net within a swimming flume.

Cory Suski (University of Illinois, USA)

Project: The role of physiology in the effects of recreational and commercial fisheries.


Juvenile zebrafish in a static respirometer, used to measure oxygen consumption.

Juvenile zebrafish in a static respirometer, used to measure oxygen consumption.

Robert Arlinghaus (Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Germany)

Project: The effects of growth rate selection on metabolic physiology and behaviour in fishes and implications for fisheries-induced evolution.


Two views of a school of sea bass swimming within a large swim flume. Each fish has been implanted with an accelerometer to record their movements in three dimensions.

Two views of a school of sea bass swimming within a large swim flume. Each fish has been implanted with an accelerometer to record their movements in three dimensions.

Lewis Halsey (University of Roehampton, UK), Julian Metcalfe and Serena Wright (CEFAS, UK)

Project: The use of accelerometry tags to investigate the hydrodynamic benefits of schooling in fishes.


Bob Gregory (Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canada), Mary Ryan (University of Glasgow), and Paul Snelgrove (Memorial University, Canada)

Juvenile Atlantic cod after capture by seine. Photo courtesy of Mary Ryan.

Juvenile Atlantic cod after capture by seine. Photo courtesy of Mary Ryan.

Project: The effects of habitat fragmentation and factors affecting patch departure decisions in juvenile Atlantic cod. 


Doug Glazier (Juniata College, USA) and David Atkinson (University of Liverpool, UK)

Project: The effects of ecological factors on the scaling of metabolic rate with body size .